Online Course - Multi Media

Fostering Resilience in Children and Families after Divorce

This course runs on PCs Only                     Published: Oct 2006
                    Note: You must use Internet Explorer as your browser for Windows/PC only classes

Course Description

What makes a divorce good? Using the most current research on the long-term effects of divorce on children, Dr. Ahrons will compare and contrast good and bad divorces, showing the impact of each on children and families. She will challenge the current stereotypes and clarify the confusing findings about the long-term outcomes of divorce for children and families. Participants learn to identify the components of a good divorce and understand the concepts of the “binuclear family” and the “limited partnership model” and how to translate these into effective practice. A video tape demonstration will show a model of brief binuclear family therapy that can be adapted to complex families of divorce and remarriage. Participants explore issues such as working with high conflict parents, the relationships between first and second spouses and when to work with the whole family system or subsystems.

Objective

  • Describe research findings on the effect of divorce on children
  • Identify the fundamentals of a good divorce
  • Describe how parents can foster resilience in their children
Price: $119.00
6.0 Credits

Constance Ahrons, Ph.D.

Instructor

Constance Ahrons, Ph.D.

Constance Ahrons, Ph.D., is professor emerita of sociology and the former director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Doctoral Program at the University of Southern California (USC). She is the author of the best-selling book "The Good Divorce: How to keep your Family Together When Your Marriage Comes Apart" and "We're Still Family: What Grown Children Have to Say About their Parent's Divorce." She lectures and gives workshops nationally and internationally and has written extensively on divorce and remarriage. She is a leading authority on divorce, remarriage and family change.